Wilson Combat Guide to NFA Ownership

Is it legal for you to own a Silencer/Short Barreled Rifle-Shotgun?

The first thing you need to do is determine if suppressor/NFA ownership is legal where you live. Currently, the following states allow private ownership of suppressors: AL, AR, AK, AZ, CO, CT, FL, GA, ID, IN, KS, KY, LA, ME, MD, MI, MO, MS, MT, ND, NE, NV, NH, NM, NC, OH, OK, OR, PA, SC, SD, TN, TX, UT, VA, WA, WI, WV, and WY. Even if you live in one of these states, you should verify that owning a suppressor/NFA firearm is legal in your area.

Many people are under the mistaken impression that they need a “Class 3” license in order to own a suppressor/NFA firearm. This is not true. If you live in a state where ownership is legal, and you can legally own a firearm, then you can buy a suppressor/NFA firearm.

How should you register your new silencer/NFA firearm?

We can’t ship a suppressor/NFA firearm directly to your house- you will need to locate an FFL holder in your state with a Class 2 or 3 SOT (Special Occupational Taxpayer License) that can handle the transfer for you.  We can even help you locate an FFL/SOT holder in your area if you don’t already deal with one.

You won’t be able to take possession of the suppressor/NFA firearm until the transfer process between us and your dealer has been completed by the ATF and then your registration paperwork is approved by the ATF after filing for your $200 tax stamp. This typically takes between 4-6 weeks to transfer the product to the dealer and then 12 or more months for the ATF to grant your approval in the form of a tax stamp.

Step 1-Identify the item you are interested in purchasing and make sure it is legal in your state. Pay for the item either online or by contacting us.

Step 2-Identify a dealer in your state that is able to complete the transfer paperwork from us to them and provide us with that dealer's contact or license information

Step 3-Upon manufacture of item, fill out various required forms and send to ATF with the assistance of your transfer dealer and wait for ATF approval to possess the item

Want more info?

http://www.atf.gov/firearms/faq/national-firearms-act-firearms.html
http://www.ar15.com/content/legal/nfaFAQ.html

Once you’ve determined that you can legally own a suppressor, you should carefully consider what the best method will be for you to register a suppressor. There are three possible ways to register a suppressor/NFA firearm, and each method has its own pros and cons:

1. Register the suppressor in your own name

Advantages:
You can avoid initial work required to setup a trust or corporation

Disadvantages:
Only you can be in possession of the suppressor
Requires signature from chief law-enforcement officer where you live
Requires fingerprint cards

Best for:
People who don’t plan to buy a lot of NFA items
People who just want to get the buying process started
People who always plan to be present when the suppressor is in use

2. Register the suppressor to a trust

Advantages:
Anyone listed as a trustee in the trust can be in possession of the suppressor
A revocable trust can be changed at any time without notifying the ATF
No signature is required from chief law-enforcement officer
No fingerprint cards are required
You only need to create the trust once. The same trust can be used for all future suppressors or other NFA items (such as short barreled rifles)

Disadvantages:
Some initial work and cost is required to setup the trust. Many people create their trust with software like Quicken WillMaker – or you can also talk to a gun trust lawyer who will set it up for you.
In some states, a trust needs to be registered with the state – although that is not a requirement in most cases.

Best for:
People with family members who want to share possession of the suppressor
People who want to go together with friends on the purchase of a suppressor
People who want more flexibility in the long run
Anyone planning on making multiple NFA purchases who want to avoid the overhead of getting the CLEO signature and fingerprints each time

3. Register the suppressor to a corporation

Advantages:
Any officer of the corporation can be in possession of the suppressor
If you already have a corporation, this can be easier than a trust since you will avoid the initial trust setup
No signature is required from chief law-enforcement officer
No fingerprint cards are required

Disadvantages:
You need to keep your corporation in good standing, which can be more work than a trust (which is basically a “create it and forget about it” process in most cases)

Best for:
Anyone who already owns a corporation, and wants that corporation to act as the owner of the suppressor
Anyone planning on making multiple NFA purchases who want to avoid the overhead of getting the CLEO signature and fingerprints each time.

All information subject to change.

Instruction Manual (PDF) Coming Soon